Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Kate Soper’ Category

Join us for the London launch for Set 4 of Verso’s highly popular Radical Thinkers series, bringing together the seminal texts of the world’s leading intellectuals.Radical Thinkers Series 4 Logo

DON’T LOOK BACK

RADICAL THINKERS AND THE ARTS SINCE 1909

Thursday 26 November 2009, 18.30–20.00

Tate Britain, Millbank, London SW1P 4RG


WITH TERRY EAGLETON, SIMON CRITCHLEY, KATE SOPER, EYAL WEIZMAN AND CHAIR ALBERTO TOSCANO

 

On the 100th anniversary of the Futurism Manifesto, join critical thinkers TERRY EAGLETON, SIMON CRITCHLEY, KATE SOPER, EYAL WEIZMAN and CHAIR ALBERTO TOSCANO  in exploring a century of radical thinking and the arts – and debating what lies ahead. The recent Futurism exhibition at Tate Modern reminds us of an age when politics and aesthetics were densely interwoven in an explosive rejection of the past. This distinguished panel will assess the legacy of modernism to ask how today’s radical thinkers might understand the role of the arts at the dawn of the twenty first century and beyond.

Tate logo

Tate Britain Auditorium
£8 (£6 concessions)
For tickets book online here or call 020 7887 8888.

 

 

 

Verso 9781844673506 Walter Benjamin or Towards a Revolutionary Criticism smallTERRY EAGLETON is Professor of English Literature at the University of Lancaster. His many books include Walter Benjamin: Or, Towards a Revolutionary Criticism in Set 4 of Radical Thinkers, Reason, Faith, and Revolution: Reflections on the God Debate and the forthcoming The Task of the Critic: Terry Eagleton in Dialogue

Read Terry Eagleton’s ‘Waking the Dead’ article in the New Statesman, reflecting on what Benjamin’s approach to history and memory can tell us about America in the 21st century.

 

Critchley 1SIMON CRITCHLEY is Professor of Philosophy at the New School for Social Research in New York and author of  Ethics-Politics-Subjectivity: Derrida, Levinas and Contemporary French Thought in Set 4 of Radical Thinkers, Infinitely Demanding: Ethics of Commitment, Politics of Resistance, The Book of Dead Philosophers, On Humour and Continental Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction.

 

Verso 978-1-85984-461-8 Relish the SublimeKATE SOPER is a Professor in the Department of Humanities, Arts and Languages at London Metropolitan University and author of To Relish the Sublime? Culture and Self-Realization in Postmodern Times.

Eyal high resEYAL WEIZMAN is an architect and Director of the Centre for Research Architecture at Goldsmiths College, University of London and author of Hollow Land: Israel’s Architecture of Occupation.

 

FINAL FRONT COVER_Toscano_Fanaticism smallChair: ALBERTO TOSCANO, editor of Historical Materialism, lecturer in sociology at Goldsmiths College, University of London and author of The Theatre of Production: Philosophy and Individuation Between Kant and Deleuze and the forthcoming Fanaticism: On the Uses of an Idea.

 

 

 

Supported by

New Statesman logo

 

 

Praise for Radical Thinkers:

“An extremely pleasant surprise: a new imprint from Verso called Radical Thinkers, and a pile of white-covered paperbacks by the likes of Theodor Adorno, Fredric Jameson, Guy Debord and Walter Benjamin. Not only do they have nifty cover designs, they are ridiculously cheap.” Nick Lezard, Guardian

“A compendium of left-wing philosophical and political thought, inoculating it against the ‘great idea’ of philosophy-as-self-help. As a way of transforming… formless disgust into educated critique, these books are a fine, cheap and decidedly elegant starting point.” Owen Hatherley

“A golden treasury of theory” Eric Banks, Bookforum

“Verso’s beautifully designed Radical Thinkers series, which brings together seminal works by leading left-wing intellectuals, is a sophisticated blend of theory and thought. The 12 authors whose writings are included in the series have worked tirelessly to expose the mechanisms by which culture and knowledge are manufactured, managed and controlled.” Ziauddin Sardar, New Statesman

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Third Text, Volume 23, Issue 5, September 2009 announced a call for papers for its centenary issue and is itself a special issue entitled ‘Art: A Vision of the Future”.

Verso 9781844674282 First as Tragedy smallSlavoj Žižek‘s piece, Notes on a Poetic-Military Complex, argues “the predominance of religiously (or ethnically) justified violence can be accounted for by the very fact that we live in an era that perceives itself as post-ideological. Since great public causes can no longer be used to incite mass violence, that is, since our hegemonic ideology calls on us to enjoy life and to realise our Selves, it is difficult for the majority to overcome their revulsion at torturing and killing another human being. The majority would need to be ‘anaesthetised’ against their elementary sensitivity to the suffering of others in order to do this. Religious ideologists usually claim that religion makes some otherwise bad people do some good things; from today’s experience, one should give more weight to Steven Weinreich’s claim that, while without religion good people would do good things and bad people bad things, only religion can make good people do bad things.”

His latest book First as Tragedy, Then as Farce is out now.

Susan Buck-Morss, author of Thinking Past Terror: Islamism and Critical Theory on the Left‘ argues in Radical Cosmopolitanism that”‘Art’Verso 1844675629 Thinking Past Terror is a modern concept, limited in time and space. Its role has been taken over by the ‘artworld’, which thrives in our era of globalisation. Is YouTube today a more creative space than the artworld? Should we be concerned? Rasheed Araeen calls for a ‘true universalism’ to replace the fragmented orientations of creative work in the recent past. What would this mean as an alternative to the artworld? What strategy of creative work, in theory as well as art, could produce a social field that defies boundaries, real and imagined? What would a radical, cosmopolitan space look like that understood its task as refusing to align itself with a particular political position (even a ‘progressive’ position)?”

FINAL FRONT COVER_Toscano_Fanaticism smallAlberto Toscano, author of the forthcoming Fanaticism: On the Uses of an Idea and chair of the launch event for set 4 of the Radical Thinkers series at the Tate Britain ‘Don’t Look Back: Radical Thinkers and the Arts Since 1909’, also contributed to the series of Special Issues. The Sensuous Religion of the Multitude: Art and Abstraction in Negri, in Volume 23 Issue 4 ‘Art, Praxis and the Community to Come’, through a detailed reading of Antonio Negri’s collection of letters on art, Arte e Multitudo, “enquires into the place and the uses of art in his writings. It identifies abstraction as the pivotal theme in the Italian philosopher’s reflections on aesthetics. Abstraction is a cipher for the defeats of the extra-parliamentary left and the imposition of a seemingly inescapable postmodern capitalism, but it is also the starting-point for an attempt to reconstruct a potent political subject in the midst of a world wholly subsumed by capital and the commodity-form. The article critically explores Negri’s attempt to tie together a theory of the periodisation of capitalism (and anti-capitalism) with a prophetic discourse on sensuous politics which explicitly repeats the early German Idealists’ search for a ‘sensuous religion’ that would serve as the prelude to a new politics.”

‘Don’t Look Back: Radical Thinkers and the Arts Since 1909’ is at the Tate Britain on Thursday 26 November 2009, 18.30–20.00

On the 100th anniversary of the Futurism Manifesto, join critical thinkers Terry Eagleton, Simon Critchley, Kate Soper, Eyal Weizman, and chair Alberto Toscano in exploring a century of radical thinking and the arts – and debating what lies ahead. The recent Futurism exhibition at Tate Modern reminds us of an age when politics and aesthetics were densely interwoven in an explosive rejection of the past. This distinguished panel will assess the legacy of modernism to ask how today’s radical thinkers might understand the role of the arts at the dawn of the twenty first century and beyond.

Read Full Post »